Monthly Archives: February 2012

Caceres to Casar de Caceres

We walked out of town in the dark on a very busy main road. It was scary because the cars were going very fast and very close. Sometimes we were flat against the guardrail, walking right on the line designating the edge of the road, because there was no shoulder. The wind created by passing trucks threatened to suck us into the stream of traffic. In other places there was about a 12-inch shoulder that led to a straight drop off into oblivion. We were all wearing somewhat dark clothing, and were afraid to turn on our headlamps and chance blinding the oncoming traffic. However, once we had begun there was no way to turn around. I was just thankful that the cars seemed to see us at the last second and move over if they could. There were several close swipes when traffic was coming from both directions.

Just as it was getting light the track veered off to the left to a dirt road. This allowed us to enjoy a spectacular sunrise over the rolling grasslands. As we came to the crest of a hill we looked back, and there stood Caceres atop the hill, illuminated like the city of gold that it originated from.

It was only about 6 miles to the town of Casar de Caceres where we stopped, but it was too far to combine the next stage, so we took a short day. Alan is able to walk the longer distance and has pushed on. I am sorry to see his smiling face go. He is a gentle man with mischief in his eyes and kindness in his heart. As we sat having our first café con leche of the day at 9:30, Judy began looking at her book and counting her remaining walking days. I knew she was too full of energy to arrive at her destination so early, but I was sick at heart realizing she would walk on too. Two Pilgrims arrived just then and stopped to ask if one of us had lost a hat. Someone had indeed dropped the hat, so it was returned Camino style. When Judy learned they were walking on to the Albergue at the lake 15 miles distant, she saddled up and went with them. We hardly said goodbye, and I hated like crazy to see her go. It was the right decision for her. She needs to move on in order to reach Santiago in the time she has left, and she is fit enough to do the longer distances. She has been fun, kind, and always positive. I shall miss her terribly, but that is the way of the Camino. Your lives touch, then you must walk on separately. Yet the world is a smaller and more intimate place knowing these beautiful people from around the globe. I feel very blessed that they touched my life.

This is a friendly, cute little town. The Albergue is free and they would not consider a donativo. The library has computers where you can email for free, although I was careful to work quickly so that the kids waiting to do their homework had ample time. It would be very rude to abuse the hospitality of this sweet little town. There is a new promenade into town with lush wisteria covered arbors, palm trees, and untrimmed shady plane trees. It sits at the edge of a shallow lake, which is bordered by a nice walkway with benches.

In the Farmacia it was “little old lady day”. There was spirited discussion about politics, family, and ailments. One particularly frail Senora walked over and hoisted herself up on to a machine, sticking her arm into the blood pressure cuff only to the wrist. She looked confused, took her print out and moved to dismount. Grabbing her walker, she declared, “The machine says I am dead! I am going home now!” An equally ancient Senora crossed herself, praying, “Madre Dios! I don’t understand these things!” They ambled off together immersed in a lively discussion about the merits and disadvantages of technology.

Distance from  Caceres to Casar de Caceres= 7  Miles / 11.5 Kilometers

Actual Distance Walked= 12.4 Miles / 20 Kilometers

Accommodations= Municipal Albergue across from the ayuntamiento, or town hall, on the Plaza de Espana. Great, clean little Albergue with 24 places, kitchen, free. Pick up the key and get your stamp in the ayuntamiento.

If you are enjoying this trek along the Via de la Plata, and the imagery, please share this blog with your friends and family. Visit my website at www.theartistsjourney.com to see the complete collection of my artwork or purchase “The Artist’s Journey.”

Please help others find this blog by Liking me on facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/ArtistsJourney Tell your friends!

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Caceres, City of the Conquistadors

The old center of Caceres is enchanting. Huge solares, or manor houses, line the narrow cobbled streets. Shady canyons are created by the tall buildings, and as you look up at the sliver of blue sky gargoyles peer down at you. Steep steps lead up tunnels through the fortified walls. From the top you can see all of Cacares and the surrounding countryside. Flowers tumble down the steps, while storks circle over head and land gracefully to become part of the architectural details. Churches and palm trees stand guard over lovely plazas, and a solo guitar player passionately sung the rhythms of Spain. His strong guitar strumming and haunting voice reverberated off of the walls and filled the air.

The city was founded by the Romans in 34 BC and the walls that still circle the old town date to that period. Held by the Moors for several centuries, it became definitively Christian in 1229. The palaces and ancestral houses began to be built at that time, but it was 250 years later that most of the present building emerged. This old center was built almost exclusively in the late 1400’s and 1500’s as the wealth from the Americas poured in.

Many of the Conquistadors came from this region and returned here to settle when finished with their adventures. They went into competition with each other as to who could build the biggest house. Handsome crests decorating the outside of the buildings indicate the family who owned each house. This is the town to which Juan Cano de Saavedra, conquistador and follower of Cortez, brought an Aztec Princess as his bride. What a shock that must have been for her. Daughter of royalty, her civilization no more, how would she have viewed Caceres? This city of gold, so rich and solid, was built with the wealth from the Americas. It is hauntingly beautiful, yet I think of the rape of 2 continents and the destruction of entire civilizations. The enslaving of so many people, and the death of so many more, was the cost. Is it human nature to take just because we can? Why do we have to be so disrespectful and cruel?

These philosophical questions aside, it is a beautiful city and a wonderful place to spend some time. History has moved on to a gentler place, and no one can predict what would have become of the Americas if they had not been discovered and explored by Spanish and other European nation

Actual Distance Walked around Caceres= 4.21 Miles / 7  Kilometers

Accomodations=  We stayed at the very helpful and friendly Pensione Carretero, 25 Euro for a double room or 12.5 Euro per person. Large room with shared bathroom. Right on the main square, the Plaza Mayor. There is an Albergue Turistico near the main square, 70 places, 16 Euro or 18 Euro with breakfast. Additionally, there is the Albergue Las Valetas, 17 Euro or 20 Euro with breakfast.

If you are enjoying this trek along the Via de la Plata, and the imagery, please share this blog with your friends and family. Visit my website at www.theartistsjourney.com to see the complete collection of my artwork or purchase “The Artist’s Journey.”

Please help others find this blog by Liking me on facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/ArtistsJourney Tell your friends!


It is not always easy

I am hoping that I have had my worst day and that things will improve from here on out. It was very hard limping along on my blisters. I must have been favoring my feet and not lifting them as high as usual. The trail was very rocky and uneven. I fell down hard, gashing my knee and elbow. Alan tried to help me and I almost crippled the poor guy. I was just dead weight and had no strength to stand up. We removed my pack, finally pushed and pulled me into an upright position, and off we went. Not more than 10 minutes later I fell again. This time I was dizzy and nauseated. I just had to sit there for awhile, and kindly Alan gave me the best comfort food in the universe, chocolate. I cleaned the bleeding parts with alcohol wipes and antibiotic ointment, then bandaged them with big pads and tape. I drank lots of water. Everyone was very concerned and walked slowly with me as we continued painfully along. Wouldn’t you know we had scheduled a long day? By the time we struggled into the center of Caceres, it was 3:00 and 95* F. I was really dehydrated because I had run out of water, and I was suffering with the heat.

By tonight my ankle was beginning to swell where I twisted it today. I decided it was time to peel the Compeed off of my blisters and take a look at them. I got a very nasty surprise: they had not healed. They were about the size of my thumb, 1 inch wide and 1 ½ inch long, and an angry red color. I was afraid they were infected, so I immediately went to the Farmacia. The woman tut-tutted when she saw them and hauled out a veterinary sized needle, a bottle of iodine, a big box of gauze pads, more tape, and bigger pads of Compeed. She told me to pop and drain the blisters, scrub them with iodine, reapply the compeed and make a big padded boot out of the gauze and tape. I was instructed to repeat this process each day until they healed. When I asked if I could continue walking tomorrow, she rolled her eyes and I am pretty sure I heard the word retardamente.

I limped out of the Farmacia, biting my lip, carrying a bushel sized bag of medical equipment. Judy, Alan and Kess looked very concerned. I told them to get a big bottle of medicinal wine ready for when I returned, because this treatment was going to hurt like a mother.

It did not actually hurt as much as I thought it would, and the pressure is now relieved. It was lucky for me that we had planned a rest day tomorrow to see Caceres.

I returned to the Plaza and found a table full of Australian, Dutch and German Pilgrims waiting for me. I propped my feet up and we enjoyed a pleasant evening eating lentil soup, ice cream cones, and sipping wine. We watched the sun turn the old city into gold. This town looks like it will be amazing if I can walk to see it.

Distance from   Aldea de Cano to Caceres=14.4  Miles / 23 Kilometers

Actual Distance Walked= 17.47 Miles / 28+  Kilometers Steadily up all day.

Accommodations=  We stayed at the very helpful and friendly Pensione Carretero, 25 Euro for a double room or 12.5 Euro per person. Large room with shared bathroom. Right on the main square, the Plaza Mayor. There is an Albergue Turistico near the main square, 70 places, 16 Euro or 18 Euro with breakfast. Additionally, there is the Albergue Las Valetas, 17 Euro or 20 Euro with breakfast.

If you are enjoying this trek along the Via de la Plata, and the imagery, please share this blog with your friends and family. Visit my website at www.theartistsjourney.com to see the complete collection of my artwork or purchase “The Artist’s Journey.”

Please help others find this blog by Liking me on facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/ArtistsJourney Tell your friends!


Aldea del Cano to Caceres

Senor Spandex got up very noisily at 4:45 AM and turned on all of the lights. He exited by 5:00, making sure everyone was awake, and left the door open to flap in the breeze as he left. Such is life in the Albergues! We needed to get up anyway because it promised to be another hot day and we needed an early start.

The walking was steadily up hill all day and much of the time paralleled main roads and freeways. We have walked into a very open landscape without shade. It was 95*F under blue, cloudless skies. Large farms with grazing sheep stretched in every direction. The mountains to the west shimmered in the heat.

The area surrounding Caceres is a maze of industrial areas and unmarked streets. It was very hard to find the yellow arrows, but eventually we came to a hill rising above us with fortifications on top. We thought this could not possibly be the way, so we skirted around it and found ourselves in a lovely modern part of town. After sucking down 2 bottles of ice cold water from a vendor, as we had run out of water much earlier, we contemplated the taxi stand. I decided to give it one last try and flagged down a couple who turned out to be English speaking tourists with a map. It’s a miracle! We were only a few blocks from the center of the old city, so we saddled up and limped on.

The Albergues were both completely full of school groups. We found a space at the Pensione Carretero right on the main square. We got a room at the back so that it would be quiet. We immediately showered and slept for an hour. Rejuvenated, we stuffed ourselves on Paella, croquettas, and gigantic ice cream cones.

Alejandro, the young man who owns the Pensione Carretero spent several hours loading all of my photos on to his laptop. He compressed them and sent them home for me. It will take all night. I had no idea when I asked him to help me that it was so time consuming. I am very touched by his generosity and kindness.

We sat watching the sunlight of the evening hours light the old city walls of Caceres to a golden glow.   The clear sky turned a deep violet color and stars came out, twinkling magically across the heavens.

Distance from   Aldea de Cano to Caceres=14.4  Miles / 23 Kilometers

Actual Distance Walked= 17.47 Miles / 28+  Kilometers Steadily up all day.

Accommodations=  We stayed at the very helpful and friendly Pensione Carretero, 25 Euro for a double room or 12.5 Euro per person. Large room with shared bathroom. Right on the main square, the Plaza Mayor. There is an Albergue Turistico near the main square, 70 places, 16 Euro or 18 Euro with breakfast. Additionally, there is the Albergue Las Valetas, 17 Euro or 20 Euro with breakfast.

If you are enjoying this trek along the Via de la Plata, and the imagery, please share this blog with your friends and family. Visit my website at www.theartistsjourney.com to see the complete collection of my artwork or purchase “The Artist’s Journey.”

Please help others find this blog by Liking me on facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/ArtistsJourney Tell your friends!


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